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PLAY AND CHIT-CHAT

Babies tend to like tickling games involving speech, repetition and touch. It’s a good idea to stick to the same framework for games, as the baby will quickly learn what’s about to happen.

 “Babies like routines because they give the baby a sense of having some control over their surroundings,” explains Professor of Developmental Psychology Gustaf Gredebäck.

INTERACT AND TICKLE

Nursery rhymes and songs are usually popular because they’re predictable yet exciting at the same time. Interacting with the baby by touch helps the baby to develop their body image. Babies think hands are hugely exciting, and songs involving your and your baby’s hands are fun for babies.

your-first-year-lek-prat-1

…OR JUST CHILL OUT TOGETHER

Babies like to study their surroundings, so mobiles with distinctive patterns are fun to look at. But faces are by far the most interesting. Lying on their tummy is also a form of play for babies and is very good for motor skills development. Make a habit of letting your baby spend time awake on their tummy several times a day while you stay very close by.

“Lying on their tummy eventually leads on to crawling and sitting,” notes Paediatric Physical Therapist Camilla von Lörinszky.

BREAK THE ICE – START TO CHAT WITH YOUR BABY

You may think your tiny baby doesn’t understand a word you say. But your baby understands more than you think! Your newborn baby is fantastically good at interpreting your body language and your tone of voice. So you can talk to your baby, even if you clearly won’t get the response you would from a grown-up. Make a habit of chatting with your baby. Comment on the things you’re doing together, e.g. “Now we’re changing your nappy, I bet that feels better.” Vary your tone when you talk – newborn babies tend to prefer a lighter tone of voice.

Your newborn baby
is fantastically good at
interpreting your body language
and your tone of voice.

A baby as young as one month old is capable of taking turns. They listen to what you say, answer in their own way, listen to your response and reply to that. Gesticulate at the same time as you talk and keep in mind that the best distance to see faces is about 30 centimeters.

 

Text: Anna-Maria Stawreberg – http://www.babybjorn.co.uk/campaigns/your-first-year/

 

David Beckham looks on proudly as grinning Harper scoots through London

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